Ta(r)tar

Beef tartare is a classic French dish, but one that is now loved around the world. There are many variations of the original dish, one story says that the Tatars put the meat under the horse's saddle and chopped it that way ... but it is a culinary legend, and this recipe is of French origin, but with a slight twist of lemon sauce. I have prepared it in various ways, but this method works best in the countries of Southeast Europe.

Buy the best steak you can for this dish - after all, it is served raw. Dry aged and organic is the best option, but if you can't find it, just make sure you have quality meat and make sure it is always kept cold. It is best to have someone in the team who was a butcher before cooking, that is my recommendation.

Make your own tartar within a few days of purchase.

 

Ingredients

 
  • 2 fresh free-range egg yolks
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 4 ounces aged beef fillet steaks
  • 1 tablespoon gherkins, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 red onion, very finely chopped
  • Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste
 

Steps to Make It

 
  1. Gather the ingredients.
  2. In a clean bowl, whisk the egg yolks until light yellow, then gradually whisk in the lemon juice and olive oil a little at a time. Make sure you only add small amounts while whisking as adding too quickly can sometimes make the mixture curdle. Finally, whisk in the Worcestershire sauce.
  3. Remove any surface fat from the steak, then cut it into thin 1/4-inch slices following the grain of the meat. Cut each slice into thin strips, then cut again to create small cubes.
  4. Place the cubes in a bowl, add the dressing, and stir well. Add the finely chopped gherkins, mustard, and red onion. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Cover and chill in the refrigerator if not serving immediately. When ready to serve, place a 4-inch chef's ring onto the 2 plates. Divide the tartare equally between the rings and, taking care, press gently with the back of a small spoon to make sure you do not leave any gaps in the bottom or sides of the ring (it doesn’t affect the taste, just the appearance). Remove the rings and serve.
  6. You can serve in another way as in a black plate, and I leave the last touch to you for creativity ...